For Educators

LESSON PLAN: Women's Voting Rights (Suffrage)
Grade Level: Middle School
Description/Purpose: Students will compare a publication from the Women’s Voting Rights Movement to a publication from current-day to gain an understanding of the issues that the suffragists were dealing with during that time, as well as to identify themes that are different and themes that have remained the same for women in the United States.
QUIZ: General Women’s History American women have contributed to and shaped all aspects of American culture. See how many of the following 40 questions your students can answer about the wonderful women in American history!

This Week in Women’s History

September 2, 1838: Queen Liliʻuokalani is born.

Historical Bios

ELIZABETH BLACKWELL (1821-1910)
Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman in America to receive her medical degree. She served as a pioneer for women in the medical profession and promoted the education of women in the medical profession through lectures and by opening her own medical college for women. Read More…

LUCY LARCOM (1824-1893)
Although Lucy Larcom was a well-published poet in her lifetime, she is best known today for writing A New England Girlhood (1889). This autobiography is a classic book about the age of industrialization and her role in it as a textile mill worker – beginning at age eleven. Read More…

ROSE MORGAN (1912-2008)
As owner of the largest and most visible African American beauty salons in the U.S. in the 1950s and 1960s, Rose Morgan became a symbol of achievement in the civil rights era. The 1955 opening of her second and grandest salon – Rose Meta House of Beauty – in Harlem was heralded in the black and mainstream press alike. The event drew a crowd of more than 10,000 people. Read More…

Quotations

"There is no female mind. The brain is not an organ of sex. Might as well speak of a female liver."

Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Writer and lecturer

"If you don't like the way the world is, you change it. You have an obligation to change it. You just do it one step at a time."

Marion Wright Edelman
Attorney and civil rights advocate

"A ship in port is safe, but that is not what ships are for. Sail out to sea and do new things."

Rear Admiral Dr. Grace Hopper
Computer scientist who invented COBOL