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Dorothea Dix and Cornelia Hancock

On April 14, 1861, Fort Sumter fell—the beginning of four years of brutal war. Thousands of women volunteered as nurses. By one estimate, more than twenty thousand women serves as nurses on the Union side during the war.
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Celebrating Asian American Women

Asian American women have made a significant impact on the United States in a wide variety of fields. Despite facing both racial discrimination and sexism, these women stood strong, challenged stereotypes, and paved the way for future generations.
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Daring Dames

Women have worked hard and sacrificed much through the centuries to achieve their status in American society. Here are 4 Daring Dames who defied stereotypes to accomplish great things.
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Fanni's Viennese Kitchen

When my mother was a young teenager during the Great Depression, she was too embarrassed to bring her friends over to witness the homey scene taking place in the central dining room.
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Department Stores: Changing the Fashion Pattern

Department stores such as Lord & Taylor, Macy's, and Woodward & Lothrop played important roles in the relationship between the fashion industry and marketing to the female consumer. They became popular towards the end of the 19th century and turn shopping
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Shop Til’ You Drop

Our culture defines shopping as a feminine pursuit. In our consumer culture women are seen as the primary consumers. But why and how did consumerism and shopping come to be associated with femininity?
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Women's History Costume Ideas

Looking for a women's history inspired Halloween costume? Check out these notable women in history. To learn more about these women, watch the video below.
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Eleanor Roosevelt’s White House Press Conferences

“We had it in the Red Room,” Eleanor Roosevelt told her friend, journalist Lorena Hickok, after the first White House press conference for women reporters, held on March 6, 1933, a mere two days after FDR’s inauguration as president.
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